BEST BASEBALL GLOVES FOR 2017

The 2017 baseball season is here! While the best gear in the world cannot make a poor player great, bad gear can really have a negative affect on your results. With equipment like bats and gloves, you get what you pay for. To see our top 3 picks for 2017, keep reading. If you’re wanting to increase your speed or pitching velocity, you’ll want to read our review of Brent Pourceau’s Top Velocity Program.

Our philosophy is that you can pay a little more for the best and cry, or you can go cheap and cry, cry, cry. Here are some of our top picks to assist you in maximizing your training and playing at your peak level. Here are our reviews of the new lineup of 2017 Baseball Gloves.

THE 3 BEST BASEBALL GLOVES FOR 2017

Wilson A2000 1786 11.5″ Infield Baseball Glove

>>Read reviews of the Wilson A2000 on Amazon<<

The most famous baseball glove, the Wilson A2000, just keeps getting better. The Wilson glove team is constantly refining the A2000 Pro Stock patterns with the insights of hundreds of MLB players every season, and applying those alongside the innovative technology that has made the glove so popular among ballplayers at all levels.

Made with Pro Stock leather — identified specifically for ball gloves long before it reaches your hand and expertly-chosen — the A2000 is built to break in perfectly and last for multiple seasons. But even long after break-in, technological components such as Dual Welting maintain a durable pocket and long-lasting form.

Some Wilson A2000s are made with SuperSkin, a proprietary material that increases durability and lightens the weight of the glove.

What We Like:

  • Pro stock leather for a long lasting glove and a great break-in
  • Dual welting for a durable pocket
  • Dri-Lex wrist lining to keep your hand cool and dry
  • It’s not only Wilson’s best glove, it’s the best glove in baseball!

What We Don’t:

  • The price! The Wilson A2000 will run you over $200, but given the proper care, it can last multiple seasons.

Price: $225

>>Check out the Wilson A2000 at Amazon<<


Mizuno Prospect Baseball Glove (Little League)

>>Read reviews of the Mizuno Prospect Baseball Glove on Amazon<<

The all new Prospect leather series features a full grain leather shell for great durability. PowerClose Technology makes catching easy while a Parashock Palm Pad absorbs the shock of repeated use, providing outstanding protection and ideal comfort. ButterSoft Palm Liner increases durability, feel and comfort. MZO Lining disperses perspiration away from the skin. PoweLock wrist strap is the simplest and most secure fit available. Paraflex Palm increases the flexibility in the palm and FlexBridge Hinge allows the glove to close easier with less restriction on the back of the hand. – 11 Inch Model – Full Grain Leather Shell – ButterSoft Palm Liner with MZO Lining – PowerLock Wrist Strap – PowerClose Technology

What We Like:

  • 11 Inch Model
  • Full Grain Leather Shell
  • ButterSoft Palm Liner with MZO Lining
  • PowerLock Wrist Strap
  • PowerClose Technology

What We Don’t:

  • It can be a little stiff for a Little League player.

Price: $22 – $74

>>Check out the Mizuno Prospect Baseball Glove on Amazon<<


  Rawlings Sporting Goods Player Preferred Gloves with Basket Web

>>Read reviews of the Rawlings line of gloves on Amazon<<

Designed for recreational players of various age and skill levels, the Player Preferred glove series features quality, full-grain oiled leather shells for easy and quick break-in along with all-leather laces for durability and strength. With popular patterns and styling, the Player Preferred series seamlessly covers baseball, softball, and recreational leagues. Gloves from the Player Preferred series offer an improved fit and maximum control due to their back design and patented hand adjustments. Player Preferred gloves feature strong durable leather lace for continued performance. Each glove’s soft, full grain leather shell enables shape retention and quick, easy break-in without sacrificing overall performance.

What We Like:

  • THE PRICE!
  • Pro H is an extremely versatile web for infielders and outfielders
  • Modified conventional back with adjustable pull straps
  • Slow-pitch softball patterns
  • Full-grain leather shell
  • Zero Shock palm pad

What We Don’t:

  • Not a fan of the pull string tightening system.

Price: $57

>>Check out the Rawlings line of gloves at Amazon<<


HOW TO CHOOSE THE PERFECT BASEBALL GLOVE FOR 2017

For any baseball or softball player, a good glove is one of the most crucial components needed to perform at your peak level. However, not all gloves are of equal value–both in terms of quality and size. The size of your baseball or softball glove will depend on several factors such as your position, your own playing style and preference. Here’s what we’ll cover in this guide to buying the best baseball glove:

  • Knowing the different parts of a baseball glove
  • Things to think about before deciding
  • How to measure a baseball or softball glove
  • Position gloves and their differences

KNOWING THE DIFFERENT PARTS OF A BASEBALL GLOVE

Each baseball or softball glove is made up of four different parts: the webbing, fingers, palm and heel.

THINGS TO THINK ABOUT BEFORE DECIDING

  • Type of throw – This speaks of the hand used to throw a ball. Typically someone who writes right-handed will throw with their right hand.
  • RHT – Right hand thrower. A player who throws with his right hand will wear a glove on his left.
  • LHT – Left hand thrower. A player who throws with his left hand will wear a glove on his right.

Not only does the player’s position have to be considered when buying a baseball glove, there are other factors to think about as well:

    • Pocket size – The position of a player will determine what size the pocket should be. An infielder will have a shallow pocket to allow them to easily get the ball out of the glove for quick plays. An outfielder on the other hand wears a glove with a larger pocket, which makes it easier to catch fly balls.
    • Webbing – There are several types of webbing found in baseball and softball gloves. See the images below:

Closed Web

Dual post web

Modified trapeze web

Trapeze web

Single post web

Two-piece closed web

Basket web

I-web

  • Padding – How much padding in a glove typically depends on the position of the player. A Catcher’s mitt, for example, will have extra padding to protect against 100-150 catches per game. First and Third Base often require baseball gloves with additional padding.
  • Wrist Adjustments – Some gloves come with the ability to adjust the tightness of the wrist, which can make it easier for the player to put on or remove the glove. These adjusters can come in a variety of styles including velcro or a laced system.
  • Material – Obviously the most common and favored material in baseball and softball gloves is genuine leather. However, gloves can be made of synthetic materials as well. Leather provides longer wear and should be conditioned with oils for faster break in times.

POSITION GLOVES AND THEIR DIFFERENCES

We covered the different types of webbing above, but now let’s look at which types of webbing are preferred by each position:

  • Pitchers: closed- either 2-piece or one-piece closed to hide stitches when preparing a pitch.
  • Middle Infielders: shallow pockets- either single post or I-web
  • 3rd basemen: stronger, deeper pockets- either dual post, or trapeze/ modified trapeze webs
  • Outfielders – big, deep pockets- H-web, modified trapeze or trapeze

Fastpitch Softball Gloves

Just as baseball players do, positions in fastpitch softball require a specific webbing:

  • Middle infielders, first base, and some outfielders – open web that allows for quicker transfer to throwing hand
  • Pitchers, third base, and some outfielders – closed web that provides more support for outfielders and shields ball in pitchers glove

HOW TO MEASURE A BASEBALL OR SOFTBALL GLOVE

Glove sizes range from 8″ to 15″. Catchers mitts can go up to 35″. Typically, you will find the size of the glove etched in the leather on the inside of thumb or pinky finger. If a glove does not have a size etched in, you can use a fabric tape measure and measure from the center of the glove’s heel to the top of the index finger. See the image below:

Using the measurement you’ve taken of a glove, you can take the sizing chart below to know which size glove is best for your baseball or softball player.

The charts below show an estimate of the size range of the glove for a specific player for both baseball and softball:

BASEBALL GLOVE SIZING CHART BY POSITION

AGE CATCHER FIRST BASE SECOND BASE / SHORT STOP THIRD BASE PITCHER OUTFIELD
UNDER 7 29.5 – 30″ 11.5″ 8-10.5″ 8-10.5″ 8-10.5″ 9-10.5″
8 – 10 30-31″ 11.5-12″ 10.5-11.25″ 10.5-11.5″ 10.5-11.5″ 10-12″
11 – 13 30-32.5″ 11.5-12″ 11-11.5″ 11-11.75″ 11.5-12″ 11.75-12.75″
OVER 14 32-34.5″ 12-13″ 11.25-11.5″ 11.5-12″ 11.5-12″ 12-13″

FASTPITCH SOFTBALL GLOVE SIZING CHART BY POSITION

AGE CATCHER FIRST BASE SECOND BASE / SHORT STOP THIRD BASE PITCHER OUTFIELD
UNDER 7 29.5 – 30″ 11.5″ 8-10.5″ 8-10.5″ 8-10.5″ 9-11″
8 – 10 30-32″ 11.5-12″ 10.5-11.25″ 10.5-11.5″ 10.5-11.5″ 10-12″
11 – 13 31-.32.5″ 12-13″ 11.25-12″ 11.75-12.5″ 11.5-12.5″ 11.75-12.5″
OVER 14 33-35″ 12-13″ 11.5-12.5″ 11.75-12.5″ 11.5-12.5″ 12-13″

SLOWPITCH SOFTBALL GLOVE SIZING CHART BY POSITION

FIRST BASE SECOND BASE / SHORTSTOP THIRD BASE PITCHER OUTFIELD
12-13″ 11.5-12.5″ 11.75-13″ 11.5-13″ 12-15″

YOUTH BASEBALL GLOVES VS ADULT BASEBALL GLOVES

As the name implies, youth baseball gloves are made for younger players with smaller hands. They should be more flexible and easier to open and close. To make this possible, youth gloves are made of less expensive materials than adult gloves. Youth gloves are generally used for children under the age of 10 due to their smaller, more narrow fingers. You will sometimes see youth up to age 12 wearing a youth-size glove. Youth 12 years and older should be fitted for adult gloves. Between the ages of 12 and 15, it is recommended to purchase a baseball glove with a high-quality wrist adjustment that can grow with their still-growing frame. See the image below for the difference between a tightened wrist and an untightened wrist.